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Nikitty
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« on: September 12, 2007, 07:25:42 PM »

Hi all!

Since I'm sort of the makeup queen around here, I figure I may as well put down what types of make-up you should be using in what sort of settings - studio photography, stage, and regular photography. All three have similarities and differences - we'll be going over that as well. Okay, let's get started!

 Kiss

EDIT: just to add something about cosmetic brushes - you don't need many. The only ones that I think are absolute MUST HAVES are a powder brush, a blush brush, and an eyeshadow brush. Seriously, that's all you really, really need. Of course, you can have a different brush for every color you own, but that's an awful lot of money to spend, don't you think? XD

EDIT 2: By the way, if you get nothing else I mention, GET KRYOLAN'S FIXER SPRAY! It will set your makeup, making it water/sweat/rub proof, and thus stage ready. We're gonna be sweating a lot, especially for bleach on fire, and we don't want to end up looking like zombies by the end XD

EDIT 3: A few other brands if you would rather not use the ones I've mentioned:
Graftobian
RCMA
Cinema Secrets
Face Atelier
« Last Edit: September 21, 2007, 12:17:47 AM by Tris-chan » Logged
Nikitty
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« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2007, 08:07:37 PM »

Since this is where we'll get the most exposure, this is where I'll start, and we'll go step by step. It may seem like I'm telling you to go with a heavy hand (which I am) but...well, it may be easier to show then tell why.

Stage makeup in studio lighting. Looks kinda...slutty, or weird, right?
The same stage makeup on stage, with stage lights. Much better, wouldn't you say?

Step 1 - Skincare
Always have a clean and moisturized face before starting any makeup. This may seem like a given to some of us, but hey, I said basics and I mean it  Grin For stage purposes, feel free to use a moisturizer with a little sunscreen in it, but not too much! Sunscreen tends to reflect white (due to the chemicals in it) so having an spf of 10 or over may effect the rest of your makeup!

Step 2 - Base
This includes concealer, powder, and foundation. For stage use, I would always recommend makeup intended as such: Ben Nye, Kryolan, or (if you have the money and can splurge on it) Makeup Forever. Ben Nye is the easiest to find in costume shops, but Kryolan has its own store in the city, and is the brand I'd definitely recommend most. Always match your foundation color on your jawline, so that you can get a good match with your face AND neck! And if you decide not to use these brands, just make sure your foundation has NO SPF in it!

Always start with foundation, and use a clean latex sponge or (if you have one) a foundation brush. Work from the center of your face out, and apply in thin layers until you get the type of coverage you think you need. For stage, due to bright lights, you'll often need much heavier coverage than you would normally, so don't be afraid to do more than usual! And remember to BLEND BLEND BLEND, especially around the jaw, hairline, and nose (where lines tend to be obvious and/or foundation tends to cake up.)

Concealer isn't a necessity for all of us, as such heavy foundation may cover all of your, er..."imperfections", but if you feel the need, don't hesitate to use it! For under the eyes, go half a shade to one shade lighter than your foundation color, and for red spots try to match it exactly. Apply it with a clean latex sponge or brush, then pat it into your skin with your ring finger. Don't forget your eyelids! Concealer makes a great "base" for eyeshadow, keeping it from creasing or running away on you.

Powder's the last base step. I always recommend translucent, so that you don't end up changing the color of the makeup you just did! Apply it with a powder puff in very light patting motions, or with a large fluffy brush.

Step 3 - Eyes
Liner, mascara, shadows of all shapes, sizes and types...where to start?
Well, the best place to start is to dust a thick layer of your powder under your eyes. That way if your eyeshadow ends up getting sprinkled all over, you can just wipe it all away with a brush!
There are many many MANY types of eyeshadow, but the easiest ones to use are powder. They come in tons of colors and textures, so it will be easy to pick out ones that match your character's outfits!

The most basic type of shadow application is as follows: bright color on your eyelid, dark color in your crease (the space between your eyeball and your socket), and shimmery light color just underneath your eyebrow (that's your browbone!) as a highlight. There are variations, of course, and you can always add more, but three shadows will add the depth and color needed to look good on stage. And don't be afraid to make it super dark and super bright! You may feel silly, but it will look GREAT! After all, the closest people are at least 50 ft away - unless your colors are loud, they won't see them!

Eyeliner is a quick way to draw attention. A black pencil is the way to go for ease of use and visibility on stage, no matter how pale or dark you are! Line your upper lashline from inner corner to outer, and your lower lashline from the outer corner to 3/4ths of the way in. Thick lines, while usually a bad thing, actually look good on stage, so don't be afraid to make it thick! Don't forget to use your highlighting eyeshadow on the inner corner of your eyes and on that last 1/4th- it will make them look big and wide awake!

Mascara makes your lashes longer and thicker looking through waxes and other such things. For stage, I'd recommend a waterproof variety - maybelline great lash is a good one! And don't forget to curl them! That will help add to your "big and wide awake" look (something we all need after a night spent practicing, sewing, and generally screwing around till 3 AM XD) I -also- recommend false lashes - a cheap pair from the drugstore that you'll throw away afterwards. They really do make a difference!

Step 4 - Cheeks
Go for a pinky-peach blush- it looks pretty and natural on stage, and who could ask for more? And no shimmer! Apply it with a fluffy brush along your cheekbones. Don't know where they are? Just smile! See those round parts next to your nose? That's called the apple of your cheek. Who knows why, but there you go. Simply draw a line from there to your temples. Voila!
If contouring's your thing, we'll cover that in another section at another time - this is for basics!

Step 5 - Lips
This step involves three things- lipstick, lip liner, and gloss. All of them have a good shelf life, so you can buy one and have it stay good for up to 3 years!

Lipliner isn't a step most people take, but it's another one of those that "looks good on stage." Simply pick a lipliner that's two shades away from your natural lip color, outline your lips, and blend inwards with a finger so that the line isn't so crazy harsh.

Lipstick, like eyeshadow, has many colors and textures. The easiest to work with is a texture called either "satin" or "cream" or a variation of those. It's soft, with very subtle shine. Try to match your lipliner color with your lipstick, and apply it however you like. A lip brush is the most precise way!

Gloss is super easy- just get a clear one, slick it on, and go!


There. Now that wasn't TOO terribly hard, was it?
« Last Edit: September 12, 2007, 08:30:31 PM by Tris-chan » Logged
Nikitty
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« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2007, 08:27:57 PM »

Regular photography is the type you encounter most - no extra lights, just people wandering around with digicams and taking pictures. Think of this lesson as "hall cosplay makeup". This type is at the exact opposite end of the spectrum from stage makeup!

Step 1 - Skincare
Again, always start with a clean and moisturized face! And once again, sunscreen photographs oddly, so try to use a moisturizer with it in there instead of an extra one.

Step 2 - Base
You can use exactly the same products here as you did for your stage makeup - in fact, I recommend it! Stage makeup is often made with harsh lights in mind, so they look just as good in photographs as they do on stage. Simply apply fewer layers with a clean, damp sponge or brush, and you're good to go! And don't forget to set it with your translucent powder!

Step 3 - Eyes
Here is where the most differences come in between stage makeup and not-so-stagey makeup.

Eyeshadow is much more toned down here- people are coming up close, so you don't need your neon yellow or coal black to make an impression (especially not at the same time...ew.) You can and should use similar colors to that of your stage makeup - after all, it's matched or compliments your costume, right? But feel free to buy cheap here! Alternately, apply light layers of the shadows you used for your stage makeup, and layer a beige, peach, or tan eyeshadow over them. This will mute the colors and make them more appropriate for photographs.

Eyeliner can be toned down as well; use thinner lines, and go for a dark brown or dark grey instead of stark black. Highlighting the inner corner is optional here - if done lightly, it looks beautiful!

Finally, mascara. Really...this should be the same across the board ^^;; But false lashes tend to look very very overdone in person!

Step 4 - Cheeks
Stick with that same pinky-peach blush, just apply it lightly. Easy, no?

Step 5 - Lips
When applying lipstick and gloss for photographs, feel free to use a colored gloss instead - it looks pretty and polished in one step!
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« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2007, 12:49:43 PM »

 Lips Sealed

HOLY GOD! Thats alot but awsome! Thank you Trischan this sounds like a lot of fun! Lets photo shoot wooo!
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Nikitty
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« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2007, 12:20:50 AM »

Just as a note:

The -exact ingredient- that makes makeup photograph weirdly is Titanium Dioxide. It's reflective, so it will make your face look both super pale and super shiny! So really, as long as your moisturizer/foundation/concealer/powder does not have this in there, you should be okay. However, I still recommend makeup created specifically for stage use - it will stay on MUCH longer!
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